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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
we have glad you have joined us. a conversation with nassim nicholas taleb coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: he is a professor of risk engineering at nyu's polytechnic institute and author of two best-selling texts. his latest is called "antifragile." nassim nicholas taleb joins us tonight from washington. professor, good to have you back on this program. >> thank you for inviting me. tavis: i want to get into the book. let me start with the news of the day. everybody in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff. the so-called fiscal cliff. they're not talking to each other at the moment. that is what the conversation is going to get to, how do we avoid
walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get ove
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome alicia keys to this program. the 14-time grammy winner is out with her first album in years after the birth of her son in egypt. it is called, as if you did not know, "girl on fire." from the disk, here is the video to the title track "girl on fire." ♪ we got our feet on the ground, and we are burning it down ooh oh oh oh got our head in the clouds, and we are not coming down this girl is on fire this girl is on fire fire walking on this girl is on fire everybody stands as she goes by, because they can see the flame that is in her eyes ♪ tavis: being gone for three years. a baby. you learned that, taking three years off. three years in this business is so long. what trepidation, what angst, if any, does someone have when they have tried to put together a project that is three years in the making? >> this whole project, this whole time in my life, it really represents an important time for me. it is funny you bring up that word. i
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: how about that? it is called detroit, a grinning when the -- a grammy-winning jazz artists. he worked with the late great miles davis. in just a bit, another special performance. marcus miller, i am delighted to see you. >> i know exactly what you mean. tavis: the last time we talked was on my radio program, and you took off to go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people,
. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome aimee mann but to this program. the songwriter has just wrapped up a nationwide tour. her most recent project is called "charmer." she is about to enter her 20th year as a solo artist. >> if startles me. tavis: a lot to get to tonight. first, some of the very funny video for the song "labrador." >> i really did not want to do this video. i thought it was a stupid idea. the directors seemed so incompetent that i thought i was being framed. >> aimee had so many ideas. we were talking back and forth. it was so collaborative. >> the director basically tricked me into signing a contract that gave him a total control. he put something in front of me to sign. he said it was a birthday card for his nephew. >> it is my pleasure to present to you the new video of aimee mann's "labrador." take it away. >> ♪ and i run when it drops when we first met i was glad to be your pet like a lab it wa
through a successful 21st century. we are glad you could join us with our conversation with wole soyinka right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> for more information on tavis: please welcome at pbs.org. back to this program. -- please welcome wole soyinka back to the program. he is now a president -- a professor in residence, and he is the author of a new text, "of africa." >> thank you very much. tavis: you were tired of this nonsense that africans are inferior in a variety of ways. are we beyond that? >> i think it is an exaggeration to say that is why i wrote it. and number of reasons. it was to express my astonishment. it was totally mine blowing. i just mention
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. linda bradley is the founder of a program aimed at women of color called celebrate sisterhood. i read a piece that you wrote: 10 ways to put your doctor at of business and i was fascinated by what i saw and i thought to ask you. whether or not doctors really want to be put up of business and you know where i am going. there is so much money that is made in the medical profession. i wonder not to cast a person -- aspersion on you but how serious are wary about getting to a point where people do not need hospitals, they do not need doctors. they do not need the kinds of medical insurance we have. can you imagine a time when we will get to a place where we will be so healthy that we can put doctors out of business? >> i am optimistic that we can do that. doctors would relish the opportunity to take care of patients, to be looking at preventive ways to promote health. if
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. gregg allman is a grammy- winning entertainer. the allman brothers started by playing mostly are in the covers but went on to complete their own hits. the new book about his life is called "my cross to bear." is an honor to have you on the program. why did you choose that title? >> it was not so much to the title of the song, but it is hard to name a hound dog, so i tried and tried. i was going to call it "beyond the thrill, and that did not seem to perk up too many years. -- ears, and people started throwing me a bunch of names, and that one came around, and it kind of grows on you. a name has to -- tavis: sit with you for a while. i ask that because this is a tough book to read in the sense there has been so many ups and downs in your life and your career about which you were very why "mybout, but i aske cross to bare,"because it seems you have had to bear so many crosses -- bare so many crosses. you have had serious of stand- downs' in this life of yours. >> yes, but -- seriou
that that's the fascinating area in a character. so enigma secrets are, for me, very useful. tavis: beyond that, has the process that you use for choosing the kinds of roles that you want to play, has that process changed as you get older? we were talking earlier about playing an older character. but as you age, as i quote my grandmother all the time, as you become more chronologically gifted, has your process for choosing what you want to do changed? >> not really. i choose with my gut. i'll read a story and think, yeah, i like that story. i'd love to go and see that story; i'm interested by that character today, now. two years ago, that might have been different. two years hence that might be different. it depends what your appetite is wanting. if you read a story or a character that's a little bit similar to something you've just done, then you won't be attracted by it. but if you haven't just done that other thing, you would have been. so it's all dependent on the work you have been doing recently, but it's gut. it's like you look at a table of food and you think, "i think i want an ap
and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. is first gained american attention for his series, "band of brothers." "homeland" is back for its much- anticipated second season. >> i would consider it an honor to work with the man who has lived among the enemy and understands them. what do you think? are you interested? >> yes. i am interested. france could news, good news. >> i need to talk to my wife and furs. >> is there a problem? >> to be -- to my wife first. >> is there a problem? >> there could be. >> i am sure you will be able to convince her. tavis: last night i am on the plane flying back to los angeles, and i am reading the issue of "the rolling stone." he kind of miss the mark. there were some things, but i gleaned in the article the president who says his favorite tv show is "homeland." >> and he spoke exclusively about how much he loves me. tavis: he said, i love "homeland." >> when i went to the white house, they went, maureen broke back.
of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stem punker out. -- stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome keira knightley to this program. starting this friday, you can catch her in the film adaptation of the tolstoy classic "anna karenina." before we get to the new project, though, here, just a small sampling of some of her other memorable work. >> had not your pride been heard by my honesty by admitting scruples. could you expect me to progress in the interior d of your circumstances? >> those are the words of a gentleman? you were the last man in the world i could ever be prevailed upon to marry. >> dyou do know what i am talking about, don't you? you knew before i did. >> why are you crying? >> freedom in moderation. >> precisely. >> i am sure your full the best intentions. i dare say it would not spend my so vague statement. the concept of freedom is an absolute. more cannot -- one cannot be more directly dead or moderately free. it must always b
have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome richard gere to this program. the talented actor and tireless human rights advocate stars in a new film out now called "arbitrage." the movie is the story of a troubled hedge fund manager and also stars susan sarandon and tim roth, so here now a scene from "arbitrage." >> everybody wins, if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you don't have to live. you didn't know about it. that is why didn't tell you. >> that will take away my brokerage license. delmar to supervisor chu. my name in every paper. -- failure to supervise you. >> because it is my job. >> it is illegal, and i am your partner. >> you are not my partner. you work for me. that's right, you work for me. everybody works for me. tavis: i have been so anxious to talk to you. thank you for coming. >> no, it's a great pleasure. tavis: oh, we've done some radio before, but never on television. >> we
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: andy garcia stars in a film inspired by real-life speckles over water in south america. it is called "a dark truth." it is available from video on demand starting november 29. now, a scene from "a dark truth ." >> my wife -- she does not trust you. >> i know. >> she think our family will not be safe. >> is your family safe here? how long can they live like this? >> the answer is always the same until we die. >> come with me. we will stop them from doing what they did here, in other countries. you have to trust me. francisco. you must trust me. you must trust me. tavis: first of all, good to see you again. about this project -- i have been reading so much lately about how, into the future, whirs will continue to be fought, sadly. more and more, we are going to fight over is not religion, not geography, who has the right to decide the line. we are going to be fighting over water. >> it is a sustainable item. tavis: who controls the water
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. yourd by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome kristin stewart to the story. -- to this program. and the latest edition to the "twilight" saga is in theaters. you can catch her next project, "on the road," starring viggo mortensen. >> i don't care. you're just going to leave me anyway. >> when are you going back to denver? >> i don't know. i do not know what i am going to do. i could go back to my fiancee. -- fiance. >> fiance? >> he has been away while. he is nice. >> that is good. >> i wish dean was not so crazy. >> you could wish that the rest of your life. >> i just want to have a baby. something normal. i really do want that. >> i just had a great idea. you guys are going to love it. tavis: the best part is whispering to the star while the clip was playing and what they thought about this scene. kristin says, "i love this part." >> i met my favorite part of sitting on a talk show is sitting in front of a big picture. tavis: i am sorry. you
walked in and went, "when i was little, i used diapers, now i use a potty!" and she walked out of my room. i was stunned by this kid who basically was like fully owning her past. i sat down and i laughed and i wrote on a piece of paper at my desk and wrote "when i was little: a four-year-old's memoir of her youth" because she was talking about her youth like she was talking about the good old days the way we talked about james taylor back in the day or bell-bottoms or a shag or something that happened to you in the past. the idea that my daughter who was little, who was four, had a past was astonishing to me because she was so little to me. she was just a baby. so i wrote this list of things that she used to be able to not do and now she could do and, at the end of it, it made me cry and i realized it was a book. i never thought about writing a book, i never dreamt about writing a book, i never anticipated writing a book, nothing. the next thing i knew, it was a book. tavis: so she's a long way from four now. >> she'll be 26. tavis: exactly. so where do these ideas keep coming from? >> we
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)